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Local Police Alerts

The latest local Police Alerts appropriate to New Milton :-

 

cctv released after new milton thefts

 

We have issued a CCTV image of a man we would like to speak in connection with thefts from shops in New Milton.

 

Two men were reported to have carried out the following thefts:

 

• Between 9.50pm and 10pm on Tuesday 22 May at Nisa, Ashley Road - £60 worth of steak taken

• At around 7.30pm on Tuesday 22 May, Tesco in Caird Avenue - attempted theft of trampoline, valued at £150, left at the scene

• At 2.50pm on Monday 21 May at Tesco, Caird Avenue - Lay-Z-Spa stolen, valued at £299

 

The man we would like to speak to is described as follows:

 

• White
• 30 to 40 years old
• Slim
• Dark brown hair
• Tribal tattoos

 

If you have any information relating to this case, please call 101 quoting reference '44180192844', or contact Crimestoppers anonymously

 

sharp rise in fake tsb text messages and phishing emails
  • Action Fraud is warning the public about a sharp rise in fraudsters sending out fake text messages and phishing emails claiming to be from TSB.  
  • Since the start of May, there have been 321 phishing reports made to Action Fraud – an increase on the previous month where 30 reports were made. 
  • In the same reporting period, there have been 51 reports of cybercrime to Action Fraud which mention TSB – an increase on the previous month, where 24 reports were made. 
  • Action Fraud and TSB are working together to combat fraud and help keep all consumers safe.

How is this happening?

 

The increase in the number of reports being sent to Action Fraud is in part linked to the system issue some TSB customers have experienced over recent weeks. Opportunistic fraudsters are using TSB’s system issue to target people with this type of fraud. TSB, or any bank, will never ask for a PIN, password or full memorable information by email or text. 
 
Fraudsters are commonly using text messages as a way to defraud unsuspecting victims out of money. This is called smishing (SMS + fishing). Of the smishing attempts reported to Action Fraud, 80% requested that the recipient click onto a website link. The second most common delivery technique reported has been email.
 
Fraudsters are using specialist software which changes the sender ID on text messages so that it looks like messages are being sent by TSB. In some instances, this spoofed text is being added to existing TSB message threads on victim’s phones.
 
Should someone click on the link within a spoofed text message and enter their personal information, the fraudsters then call the victim back and persuade them to hand over their one off code from their mobile phone. The fraudsters can then empty the victim’s account. 
 
Director of Action Fraud, Pauline Smith, said:
 
“We have seen an increase in opportunistic fraudsters sending text messages claiming to be from TSB that ask people to reply with their personal or banking details. 
 
“This can have a devastating effect on people, who can lose out on large sums of money.
 
“Don’t assume anyone who’s sent you a text message is who they say they are. If a text message asks you to make a payment, log in to an online account or offers you a deal, be cautious and report it to Action Fraud.”
 
A TSB Fraud spokesperson said: 
 
“While our systems are safe and secure, unfortunately fraudsters are increasingly sophisticated and looking to take advantage of situations like these by approaching customers. 
 
Protecting our customers’ information is our number one priority. We are doing all we can to ensure customers don’t become a victim of fraud, whether they bank with us in branch, online or via the telephone and this is something we are working on with Action Fraud and a number of external organisations. We are also working with these organisations to help them identify fraudulent sites so we can take them down as quickly as possible.”

 

FRAUDSTERS TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE HMRC TAX REFUND PROCESS
HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are currently processing tax refunds after the end of the tax year and criminals are taking advantage by sending out phishing emails and text messages.
 
The fraudulent emails and texts include links which take victims to fake websites where their personal and financial information can be stolen. 
 
In March 2018, HMRC requested 2,672 phishing websites be taken down and received 84,549 phishing reports. HMRC have warned that this kind of phishing is expected to continue in the coming months as genuine tax refunds are issued.
Tax refunds only come through the post or your employer 
Treasury Minister, Mel Stride MP, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury said: “HMRC only informs you about tax refunds through the post or through your pay via your employer. All emails, text messages, or voicemail messages saying you have a tax refund are a scam. Do not click on any links in these messages and forward them to HMRC’s phishing email address and phone number.
 
“We know that criminals will try and use events like the end of the financial year, the self-assessment deadline, and the issuing of tax refunds to target the public and attempt to get them to reveal their personal data. It is important to be alert to the danger.”
Other types of HMRC scams 
Fraudsters also use spoofed calls and leave victims automated voicemails saying that they owe HMRC unpaid taxes.
 
In most cases they ask for payment in iTunes gift card voucher codes and tell victims they have arrest warrants, outstanding debts or unpaid taxes in their name.
How to protect yourself 
Recognise the signs - genuine organisations like banks and HMRC will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your PIN, password or bank details.
 
Stay safe - don’t give out private information, reply to text messages, download attachments or click on links in emails you weren’t expecting.
 
Every Report Matters report phishing emails to us and forward them onto HMRC at phishing@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk

 

fraudsters offering discounts on tv subscriptions

 

Action Fraud have noticed an increase in reports where fraudsters are offering victims discounts on their TV subscription, or told their account needs to be renewed. 

 

How does this scam work? :Fraudsters are cold-calling victims, purporting to be from a Television (TV) provider offering a discount on their monthly subscription. Victims are usually told;

In order to falsely process the discount, the fraudster asks victims to confirm or provide their bank account details. The scammers may also request the victim’s identification documents, such as scanned copies of passports.

Later victims make enquiries and then discover that their TV service provider did not call them and that the fraudster has made transactions using the victim’s bank account details.

 

Affecting people nationwide : This type of fraud is nationwide. Since the beginning of this year (2018), there have been 300 Action Fraud Reports relating to this fraud. From the reports received, victims aged over 66 seem to be the most targeted.

The fraudsters are using the following telephone numbers: “08447 111 444”, “02035 190 197” and “0800 151 4141”. The fraudster’s voices are reported to sound feminine and have an Asian accent. 

 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PHISHING

 

What is phishing? : Fraudulently sending emails purporting to be from reputable companies in order to trick individuals into revealing personal information, such as passwords and financial information. Phishing can also be carried out over text messages (smishing) and phone calls (vishing).

 

Links : Don’t click on the links in unsolicited emails and texts.

 

Attachments : Don’t open the attachments in unsolicited emails.

 

Your information : Don’t reveal personal or financial information as a result of unsolicited emails, texts or calls.

 

fraud alert - automated action fraud tech support scam calls

 

We are aware of fraudsters claiming to be from Action Fraud contacting victims using automated phone calls in order to gain remote access to their computers and drain bank accounts. 

 

How does this scam work?

Victims are receiving cold-calls from fraudsters purporting to represent Action Fraud. When the calls are answered, an automated voice asks the responder to “press 1 if you have made a report to Action Fraud.” When the responder presses 1, they are transferred to a fraudster. Victims are informed that their computers have been hacked, which has led to their online bank account being compromised and funds being withdrawn. One particular victim was told that £40,000 had fraudulently left their account.

 

Remote access

Questions that are commonly asked by fraudsters include asking whether the victim’s broadband router is displaying flashing lights, as well as asking for/confirming personal information. 

This leads to the fraudster asking for remote access to the victim’s computer, via a remote access tool. Once the fraudster has gained remote access to the machine, they are often also able to access the victim’s online banking – either with permission or without.
 
The fraudsters have used the names, “Officer John Thompson”, “David Jones” and have been using several different telephone numbers, with “02921328585” appearing on multiple occasions. Victims have later discovered that it was not Action Fraud that had contacted them and accessed their computer and banking systems.

 

What you need to do

  • Even if the caller is able to provide you with details such as your full name, don’t give out any personal or financial information during a cold call. Never grant the caller remote access to your computer, never go to a website they give you and never install software as a result of the call. 
     
  • Action Fraud does not use an automated machine to speak to victims of fraud. If you receive a suspicious call, hang up immediately. 
     
  • If you think your bank or personal details have been compromised, or if you believe you have been defrauded, contact your bank immediately.
     
  • Stop all communication with the caller, make a note of their details and report it to us. Every reports matters
     
  • If you think you have downloaded a virus, consider having your computer looked at by a trusted technician in order to determine if malicious software was installed on your machine during the call.

 

FRAUD ALERT - WELL KNOWN NAMES BEING USED IN CRYPTOCURRENT SCAMS

 

Fraudulent websites claiming to offer cryptocurrency investments are using images and fabricating recommendations from prominent individuals such as Deborah Meaden from the BBC’s Dragons' Den and Martin Lewis, the founder of MoneySavingExpert.com, without their consent. 

The adverts are placed on social media and other websites and use images of these individuals to promote fraudulent cryptocurrency investments. Clicking on the advert takes you to the full article where their images are presented along with fake quotes recommending that you make investments with the fraudulent company in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin.

Alternatively, clicking on the advert will take you to a page where you are required to input your contact details. The suspect company will then phone you and persuade you to invest. 

Director of Action Fraud, Pauline Smith, said:

“Opportunistic fraudsters are taking advantage of this market, offering investments in cryptocurrencies and doing everything they can to defraud unsuspecting victims.

“Anyone who invests in cryptocurrencies should thoroughly research the company they are choosing to invest with.

“If you think you have been the victim of this type of fraud, contact Action Fraud.”

Dragons' Den investor, Deborah Meaden, said: 

“With the growing sophistication of online fraud, it becomes increasingly important to carry out checks before parting with cash online. A quick Google search will often reveal the truth and all online advertising should be read set against the premise of “If it looks too good to be true then it probably is!”

Founder of MoneySavingExpert.com, Martin Lewis, said: 

“I find it sickening that these people are leeching off the trust I’ve spent years building in order to target vulnerable people and attempt to steal their money. 

“Let me be very plain. I never do adverts. If you see my picture in an advert on Facebook or anywhere else recommending products – be it Bitcoin, binary trading, PPI firms or anything else – they are nothing to do with me. Be very, very careful.”

 

fraud alert - PREMIUM RATE "INSOLVENCY SERVICE" PHONE SCAM

 

Members of the public are being warned not to fall for a telephony scam which asks you to make premium-rate calls to the Insolvency Service. 
 
The Insolvency Service is a Government agency that supports people in financial distress, tackling financial wrongdoing and maximising returns to creditors. They have been made aware of a scam where members of the public are receiving telephone messages to make unscheduled and unnecessary calls to the Insolvency Service. 
 
Not only are unsuspecting members of the public being asked to make unnecessary calls but they are being asked to dial a telephone number that although does connect to the Insolvency Service, is not one of their official numbers and is premium-rate that costs a lot of money. 
 
According to the Government agency the scam appears to be instigated by a website based outside of the UK.

 

The Insolvency Service has given the following advice;

Read more on the Insolvency Service website.
 
Please note: Action Fraud is not responsible for the content on external websites

If you think you have been a victim of fraud you should report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 20 40 or by using the online reporting tool.

 

FRAUD ALERT - MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT DEBT

 

Victims receive a telephone call from someone purporting to be a bailiff enforcing a court judgement, attempting to recover funds for a non-existent debt. The fraudsters state the debt originates from the victim not paying a magazine advertisement subscription.

 

A variety of magazine names and publishers are being used by the fraudsters, who also commonly use the names of certified Bailiff Enforcement Agents such “Scott Davis”, “Stephen King” and “Mark Taylor”. These are names of certified Bailiff Enforcement Agents employed by debt enforcement companies.
 

The fraudsters request that the debt be repaid by bank transfer. If the victim refuses, they threaten to visit the victim’s home or place of work to recover the debt that is owed.

 

Once the money has been transferred, victims are not provided with receipt details of the payment or contact details. Later when victims make enquiries, they’ll discover that the debt did not exist, and often that no advertisement was placed.

 

This type of fraud is nationwide. Since 2017, there have been 52 Action Fraud Reports relating to this fraud. From the reports received, there are a range of different businesses and individuals being targeted.

 

Protection Advice:
 

1. Listen to your instinct: just because someone knows your basic details, such as your name and address, it doesn’t mean they are genuine.

 

2. Stay in control: always question cold callers: always contact the companies directly using a known email or phone number.

 

3. Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision: a legitimate company will be prepared to wait whilst you verify information.

 

If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

 

Visit Take Five (takefive-stopfraud.org.uk/advice/) and Cyber Aware (cyberaware.gov.uk) for more information about how to protect yourself online.

scam warning - fraudsters pretending to be medical staff

 

We would like to make people aware of a scam in which fraudsters pretend to be medical staff. 

 

We have received two reports of the scam recently where victims have been told that their close relatives have been involved in an accident, and they will need to pay money for treatment. On Saturday 24 March, a woman from Hayling Island received a call on her mobile, for which for her husband’s name came up on the caller ID. When she answered the phone, a man with an Indian-sounding accent answered.

 

He claimed to be a doctor and said her husband had been involved in a serious car collision and would need surgery for a fractured leg.

She was told that she would need to pay £300 for bolts and rods needed for the operation and that the NHS would refund her later.

When she started to question the caller, the man hung up. She was then called by her husband and realised it was a scam. On the same day, a woman in Farnborough had a similar call in which she was told her husband was being taken into theatre having been involved in an accident. The woman questioned the caller’s story, and after the phone call ended, she called her husband, who had not been involved in an accident.

 

No money was handed over in either incident.

 

We would like to remind people that health workers, or police officers, banks or any other authority figures, would never ask for money in this way.

 

Please consider the following advice:

• If you receive a call that you think is a scam, hang up immediately. If possible, use another line to call 101 to report it.

• Never give any personal or bank details over the phone to anyone who contacts you unexpectedly.

• If you have given out information which could compromise your bank security in any way, call your bank to cancel your cards as soon as possible.

• Never hand over your card, money or valuables to someone at the door to be sent off elsewhere.

• You can make yourself aware of scams and how to protect yourself against them by visiting the Action Fraud www.actionfraud.police.uk  or by calling 0300 123 2040.

 

PROLIFIC BURGLAR JAILED

 

A man has been jailed for five years and four months after pleading guilty to committing 14 burglaries between November 2016 and August 2017.

 

These took place in Sway, Hordle, Barton-on-Sea, New Milton, Colden Common, Nursling and West Wellow.

 

A further 44 burglary offences between December 2016 and August 2017 were taken into consideration - in Everton, Barton-on-Sea, Ashurst, Hordle, Sway, Colden Common, North Baddesley and Nursling, as well as Nomansland and Landford in Wiltshire.

For further info: https://www.hampshire.police.uk/news/general/prolific-burglar-jailed/

 

POLICE PRIORITIES FOR COMING MONTHS

 

Can you help us set the local community policing priorities for the New Forest for the next six months?

To ensure we’re working effectively in your area, please spare five minutes to complete a survey and tell us what issues are affecting you most.

Our aim is to reduce anti-social behaviour and crime to make your neighbourhoods safer.

 

To access the survey (closing date 31 Mar): https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/NewForest2018

 

CREDIT MULING SCAM

 

We are today warning young people about a new and growing fraudulent scam – predominantly targeting students – called credit muling.

People are being targeted online on social media platforms by job adverts.  This is normally on Facebook but we have also had reports using Snapchat and other social media apps. The majority of victims we have encountered in Hampshire have been university students.

How it works:

The victim responds to the advert online and is advised that they need to meet their would-be manager and that they are also required to undergo a credit check. A small deposit of money is placed in the victim’s account to confirm they have an active bank account.

Victim is then advised they need to obtain a business mobile phone contract. They are told to go to a mobile phone shop and take out a new phone contract in their name, using their personal details.

The suspects go with the victims to the shop and wait outside. Once the phone has been obtained, it is handed over to the scammer who then has a phone to use registered in their name together with the victims’ personal details - which can be used to commit identity fraud.

This crime has been reported across the country and is typically part of a broader organised crime operation.

How to protect yourself:

 

OPERATION SCEPTRE - AWARENESS OF RISKS OF CARRYING KNIVES

Carrying a knife may seem harmless, but it can have serious consequences. Even being with a group where one or more carry a knife is a big risk.

 

 

If you are suspicious of your child or the group they are involved in, help us stop knife crime by intervening early. Make them aware of the risks. Anyone with information about someone carrying a knife can contact us on 101, alternatively call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

 

You can find more details about how to chat to your children about this subject or report concerns anonymously here: http://noknivesbetterlives.com/

FLIGHT TICKET FRAUD

Fraudsters are attempting to entice victims who are looking for cheap flights abroad.

Victims have reported booking tickets via websites or a “popular” ticket broker, only to discover that after payment via bank transfer or electronic wire transfer, the tickets/booking references received are counterfeit. In some cases, all communications between the company or broker and the victim have been severed.

Fraudsters are targeting individuals who are seeking to travel to African nations and the Middle East, particularly those wishing to travel in time for popular public and religious holidays.

Prevention Advice:

phantom debt fraud

If you know you have a debt, keep in regular contact with your creditor and be sure to establish the debt type at the earliest opportunity if you are not aware. This will help you to understand who might be in contact with you regarding any repayments or arrears. You can report suspicious calls like these to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk  or by calling 0300 123 2040.

 

ANOTHER INSTANCE CLOSER TO HOME OF FRAUDSTERS POSING AS POLICE OFFICERS

We are issuing a warning after a woman was scammed out of £10,000 by fraudsters posing as police officers

The woman, in her 70s and from Lymington was contacted continuously by phone between Jan 11 and Jan 16 by a man pretending to be a Detective Sergeant form the Metropoliton Police Service. The so called ‘officer’ called the woman’s home phone and said that he was investigating counterfeit money and that he suspected the money in her bank to be fake. He has then asked her to help him with his investigation by going to the bank for him and withdrawing more than £10,000 cash over a four day period. She has also been advised by the ‘officer’ not to tell anyone in the bank about the investigation. The bogus police officer has then arranged for another person, claiming to be a courier, to collect the woman’s money, her bank cards and PIN numbers from her home address. A man has then turned up and told the women the money will be examined by the police.  The woman never met the man claiming to be a ‘detective’ but she did meet the ‘courier.’

We would like to speak to a man matching the following description:
•Black, possibly Kenyan
•In his 30s
•5’ 9”
•Brown eyes 
•Short brown hair
•Full brown beard
•Driving a 3 door black hatchback type vehicle that looked between 6-8 years old.

Anyone with information should call 101, quoting 44180023297.

Advice

Another version of this scam is where fraudsters posing as police officers claim to be investigating a jewellers for selling counterfeit items, and ask the victim to buy expensive goods which are later collected.  Other requests include victims buying hundreds of pounds worth of iTunes vouchers to be collected by a courier.

Police officers or bank officials would never ask you for money. If someone does call you in this way, hang up. If possible, use another phone line to report this to the police by calling 101.

We would like to remind people to protect themselves by using the following advice:
•never give out personal or bank details to anyone who contacts you unexpectedly
•never tell anyone your PIN number
•if you have given out information which could compromise your bank security in any way, call your bank to cancel your cards as soon as possible.
•never hand over your card, money or valuables to someone at the door to be sent off elsewhere

 

Advice issued after woman conned by fraudsters who posed as police officers

We are urging people to warn elderly friends and relatives after a woman lost £9,000 to fraudsters posing as police officers.

The 87-year-old victim from Yateley was called on Tuesday 14 November by a woman who said the victim’s card had been used to buy an expensive camera and that she should dial 999.

The victim did so, but the fraudster stayed on the line and a man claiming to be from the fraud department of London Police ‘answered’ the victim’s call. He told her that they were investigating a fraud involving staff at the victim’s bank. The victim was persuaded to withdraw £9,000 from the bank to help with the investigation, and urged not to tell any member of staff what was happening unless they gave an agreed codeword.

A courier later came to the victim’s house to collect the money for examination. A relative of the victim then called the police to report the fraud.

We would like to speak to a man matching the following description:

• black
• aged in his mid 20s to mid 30s
• around 5ft 5ins to 5ft 8ins tall
• of slight build
• wearing a dark baseball cap

Anyone with information should call 101, quoting 44170446378.

Advice

Another version of this scam is where fraudsters posing as police officers claim to be investigating a jewellers for selling counterfeit items, and ask the victim to buy expensive goods which are later collected.  Other requests include victims buying hundreds of pounds worth of iTunes vouchers to be collected by a courier.

Police officers or bank officials would never ask you for money. If someone does call you in this way, hang up. If possible, use another phone line to report this to the police by calling 101.

We would like to remind people to protect themselves by using the following advice:

• never give out personal or ban details to anyone who contacts you unexpectedly
• never tell anyone your PIN number
• if you have given out information which could compromise your bank security in any way, call your bank to cancel your cards as soon as possible.
• never hand over your card, money or valuables to someone at the door to be sent off elsewhere

Anyone who is concerned about a similar incident should call police on 101. If a crime is in progress, please call 999.

UNATTENDED VEHICLE BREAK-INS AROUND NEW MILTON

There has been an increase in the number of unattended vehicles being broken into in and around the New Milton area, please ensure that you park your vehicle in a well lit area and ensure that nothing of any value is left on show or in the vehicle.

 

Leaving valuable items on show in a vehicle makes it much more likely to be targeted by thieves.  With the recent incidents, windows have been smashed and the glove box and car have been searched for property.

Even items of little value, such as shopping bags and clothing, may tempt a potential thief to break into the vehicle to see whether they contain anything worth stealing. Keep your possessions out of view, or take them with you. 


Please report any suspicious persons to police.

 

phishing - here's what you need to know

For more information of how to stay safe on-line visit www.cyberaware.gov.uk

 

Your internet-connected devices are more valuable than you might think.

 

 

Readmore at www.getsafeonline.org/devices